TV Cream

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Steptoe and Son

TWO MANKY men shout at each other, first in black and white, then in colour.

7 Comments

7 Comments

  1. Lee James Turnock

    May 4, 2010 at 3:03 pm

    What’s the deal with all this revisionist Steptoe and Son bashing? It was and remains a marvellous series, superbly written and acted, and I can only think of one episode that fell flat on its arse – ‘the Seven Steptoerai’, because the idea of Albert’s pensioner mates doing kung-fu just felt all out of whack with the Shepherd’s Bush world. Apart from that, it was pretty well classics all the way.

  2. Bulko

    May 4, 2010 at 10:06 pm

    Agreed, Lee. I cannot believe S&S has been slated here. It was sharp, observational and, most importantly, very very funny.

  3. Adrian

    May 5, 2010 at 9:15 am

    They hated each other in real life aparently, which added an extra frission of realism to the acting..

  4. Lee James Turnock

    May 5, 2010 at 5:38 pm

    Depends on who you believe. Apparently Ray Galton and Alan Simpson refute any suggestion that the two leads hated each other, and the footage of Wilfrid Brambell with tears in his eyes paying tribute to Harry H.Corbett after his death seems to give the lie to the whole story. I don’t doubt that Brambell’s heavy drinking may have caused tensions, but they worked well together and that’s really all that matters.

  5. Paul Murphy

    October 28, 2014 at 10:31 pm

    The best sitcom ever bar none.

  6. Glenn A

    November 5, 2015 at 6:51 pm

    Perhaps the greatest sitcom of the sixties and TV Cream gives it the brush off, while lavishing attention on such drivel as Neighbours, a soap no one seems to have watched since John Major was in power and probably only because your student mates saw the irony in it and deep down everyone knew it was cheap crap. Steptoe and Son, along with Till Death Us Do Part, totally reinvented BBC comedy, had audience figures as high as 23 million, and is fondly remembered by its fans. Surely Seven Steptoeai and the one where Leonard Rossiter plays a prisoner who tries to hide out in Steptoe’s junk yard are light years ahead of ” highlights” in Neighbours that probably about 4 people will remember and none would watch again.

  7. Richard Davies

    November 9, 2015 at 5:48 pm

    There’s a few shows that don’t even get an entry here, or else a few lines, that should get better coverage.

    I well understand Steptoe & Son’s place in TV history, even if I that’s only through watching repeats & reading books on classic TV programmes.

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